Oceania

Embark on a journey to Oceania, a vast and enchanting region that stretches across the Pacific Ocean, encompassing a diverse array of island nations and territories. Home to Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and a constellation of Pacific Island countries and territories, Oceania teems with rich histories, vibrant cultures, and spectacular natural wonders. From the unique Aboriginal cultures of Australia, the Maori traditions of New Zealand, to the Melanesian, Micronesian and Polynesian societies scattered across the Pacific, Oceania offers a compelling study of human resilience, adaptability, and diversity. Its azure waters, pristine beaches, thriving coral reefs, rugged mountains, and rich biodiversity beckon the adventurous and the curious alike. Interwoven with tales of seafaring, colonization, and resistance, Oceania stands as a dynamic and fascinating region that bridges the expanse between the ancient and the modern, the terrestrial and the marine.

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Tourism in Oceania: A Festive and Adventurous Experience

Oceania, a region encompassing thousands of islands in the Pacific Ocean, is a dream destination for travelers seeking a unique and vibrant experience. With its rich cultural heritage, stunning landscapes, and warm hospitality, Oceania offers a perfect blend of relaxation and adventure. As the festive season approaches, the region comes alive with a joyous spirit, making it an ideal time to visit. In this comprehensive tourist guide, we will explore the best of Oceania’s tourism, from its popular attractions to practical tips for a memorable trip.

Introducing the Festive Spirit of Oceania

The festive season in Oceania is a time of celebration and community. The locals are known for their warm and welcoming nature, and visitors are often invited to join in on the festivities. From traditional dances and music performances to colorful parades and street parties, the festive ambiance is infectious. The streets are adorned with lights and decorations, creating a magical atmosphere that is hard to resist.

Unique Tourist Attractions

Oceania boasts a diverse range of tourist attractions that cater to all interests. For those seeking adventure, there are endless opportunities for hiking, surfing, and diving in the crystal-clear waters. Nature lovers can explore the region’s breathtaking landscapes, from lush rainforests to rugged coastlines. History buffs can delve into the rich indigenous cultures and visit ancient sites such as the Moai statues on Easter Island. And for foodies, Oceania offers a tantalizing array of local cuisines to savor.

Important Places to Visit

Among the must-visit destinations in Oceania is Australia’s iconic Great Barrier Reef, a UNESCO World Heritage Site famous for its stunning marine life. New Zealand’s Milford Sound, with its majestic waterfalls and towering cliffs, is another must-see. The islands of Fiji, with their pristine beaches and luxurious resorts, are perfect for a relaxing getaway. And for a taste of traditional Polynesian culture, head to Samoa, where you can witness fire dancing and other cultural performances.

Activities to Enjoy

Oceania offers a plethora of activities for tourists to enjoy. From snorkeling and scuba diving to hiking and zip-lining, there is something for everyone. For a unique experience, try sandboarding on the dunes of Australia’s Fraser Island or swimming with dolphins in New Zealand’s Bay of Islands. You can also take a helicopter ride over the Great Barrier Reef or go on a cultural tour to learn about the region’s indigenous heritage.

Infrastructure and Transportation

Getting around Oceania is relatively easy, with well-developed infrastructure and transportation systems. Most major cities have airports with international flights, making it convenient for foreign visitors. Within the countries, there are reliable public transportation options such as buses, trains, and ferries. Taxis and ride-sharing services are also available in urban areas. However, during the festive season, it is advisable to book transportation in advance as it can get busy.

Travel Information for Foreign Visitors

Visa Requirements

Visa requirements for Oceania vary depending on your country of origin. It is essential to check the specific visa requirements for the country you plan to visit before booking your trip. In general, most countries in Oceania offer visa-free entry or visas on arrival for short-term visits. For longer stays or work purposes, a visa may be required. It is best to apply for a visa well in advance to avoid any last-minute delays.

Health and Safety

Oceania is a relatively safe region for travelers, but it is always advisable to take necessary precautions. It is essential to have travel insurance that covers medical emergencies, as healthcare in some countries can be expensive. It is also recommended to get vaccinated against common illnesses such as typhoid and hepatitis before traveling. As with any destination, it is essential to be aware of your surroundings and avoid carrying valuables in crowded areas.

Local Customs and Etiquette

Oceania has a rich cultural heritage, and it is important to respect the local customs and etiquette while visiting. In many countries, it is customary to remove your shoes before entering someone’s home or a place of worship. It is also considered polite to ask for permission before taking photos of people or their belongings. When interacting with locals, a smile and a friendly attitude will go a long way in making connections.

Currency and Payment Methods

The currency used in Oceania varies from country to country. Australia and New Zealand use the Australian dollar and New Zealand dollar, respectively. Fiji uses the Fijian dollar, while Samoa uses the Samoan tala. It is advisable to exchange currency at banks or authorized exchange offices for the best rates. Credit cards are widely accepted in most tourist areas, but it is always good to have some cash on hand for smaller purchases.

Festive Activities in Oceania

The festive season in Oceania brings with it a host of unique activities and experiences for tourists to indulge in. From traditional ceremonies and performances to modern celebrations, there is something for everyone.

One of the most popular festive activities in Oceania is attending a traditional Luau in Hawaii. This Polynesian feast includes dancing, music, and a feast of local delicacies such as roasted pig and poi (taro root). In New Zealand, visitors can witness the Maori Haka, a traditional war dance, during cultural performances. And in Australia, the Sydney New Year’s Eve fireworks display is a must-see for any visitor.

Infrastructure and Transit during the Festive Season

As the festive season is a peak tourist period in Oceania, it is essential to plan your transportation carefully. While public transportation is efficient, it can get crowded during this time. It is advisable to book transportation in advance, especially for inter-island travel. You can also opt for guided tours or private transfers to avoid any hassle.

Accommodation Options

Oceania offers a wide range of accommodation options to suit every budget and preference. From luxury resorts and hotels to budget-friendly hostels and homestays, there is something for every traveler. During the festive season, it is advisable to book accommodation in advance as popular destinations tend to fill up quickly. You can also consider staying in a traditional Fale (open-air hut) in Samoa or a beach bungalow in Fiji for a unique experience.

Shopping and Souvenirs

Oceania is known for its unique and vibrant markets, offering everything from local handicrafts to fresh produce. In Fiji, the Sigatoka Market is a must-visit for its colorful array of fruits and vegetables. In Samoa, the Apia Flea Market is a great place to find traditional handicrafts and souvenirs. And in Australia, the Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne is a food lover’s paradise with its wide selection of local produce and gourmet goods.

When shopping for souvenirs, it is always best to support local businesses and purchase items that reflect the country’s culture. Look for handmade items or products made from sustainable materials to support responsible tourism practices.

Technology and Connectivity

Most countries in Oceania have good internet connectivity, making it easy to stay connected while traveling. You can purchase a local SIM card or use international roaming services for data and calls. There are also many free Wi-Fi hotspots in tourist areas. To make your trip more convenient, you can download navigation apps, language translation apps, and event booking apps before your trip.

Eco-Tourism and Outdoor Adventures

Oceania is home to some of the most pristine and diverse natural environments in the world. As responsible travelers, it is important to respect and preserve these environments while enjoying them. Many tour operators offer eco-friendly options for activities such as snorkeling, hiking, and wildlife tours. It is also important to follow guidelines and regulations when visiting national parks and protected areas.

Local Festivals and Events

In addition to the major festivals and events during the festive season, Oceania also has many smaller local festivals and events that are worth experiencing. In Vanuatu, the Naghol Land Diving Festival is a unique event where men jump from wooden towers with vines tied to their ankles as a rite of passage. In Papua New Guinea, the Goroka Show is a vibrant cultural festival showcasing traditional dances and rituals.

Practical Advice and Tips

Before traveling to Oceania, it is essential to plan your budget carefully. The cost of living in some countries can be higher than others, so it is best to research prices beforehand. It is also important to pack appropriate clothing for the country’s climate and festive occasions. For example, in Australia and New Zealand, December falls during summer, while in Fiji and Samoa, it is the rainy season.

Comprehensive Tourist Guide

If you are planning a trip to Oceania during the festive season, here are some practical tips to keep in mind:

  • Check the schedule for country events and plan your trip accordingly.
  • Book tickets for popular events in advance to avoid disappointment.
  • Research the best time to visit the country based on seasonal aspects.
  • Don’t miss out on trying local delicacies and participating in traditional activities.
  • Be mindful of appropriate attire for cultural events and places of worship.
  • Respect local customs and practices by following dos and don’ts.
  • Learn a few common phrases in the local language to communicate with the locals.
  • Keep a list of emergency contact numbers for quick assistance if needed.

In conclusion, Oceania is a vibrant and diverse region that offers a unique travel experience. With its festive spirit, stunning landscapes, and warm hospitality, it is the perfect destination for a memorable vacation. By following this comprehensive tourist guide, you can make the most of your trip to Oceania during the festive season. So pack your bags, and get ready for an unforgettable adventure in this beautiful part of the world

Oceania: A Land of Diversity and Beauty

Oceania, also known as the South Pacific, is a vast region comprising of thousands of islands spread across the Pacific Ocean. It is a diverse and culturally rich part of the world, with a unique blend of indigenous traditions and modern influences. Oceania is home to some of the most stunning landscapes, diverse wildlife, and fascinating cultures. In this article, we will explore the statistics and data that make Oceania such a remarkable region.

Geography and Population

Oceania covers an area of 8,525,989 square kilometers, making it the smallest continent in terms of landmass. It is divided into four regions: Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. The largest country in Oceania is Australia, followed by Papua New Guinea and New Zealand. The population of Oceania is estimated to be around 42 million people, with Australia having the highest population at 25 million.

The geography of Oceania is incredibly diverse, with volcanic islands, coral atolls, and rugged coastlines. The region is also home to some of the world’s most iconic landmarks, including Uluru (Ayers Rock) in Australia and Mount Fiji in Fiji. Oceania is also known for its vast oceanic waters, with the Great Barrier Reef in Australia being the largest coral reef system in the world.

Economy

Oceania has a diverse economy, with agriculture, tourism, and mining being the main industries. Australia and New Zealand have strong economies driven by agriculture and mining exports. Tourism also plays a significant role in the economy of many Pacific Island nations such as Fiji, Vanuatu, and Samoa.

The region is also rich in natural resources, including gold, copper, and oil. These resources have played a vital role in the economic growth of countries like Papua New Guinea and New Caledonia. However, the exploitation of these resources has also led to environmental concerns and conflicts with indigenous communities.

Culture and Diversity

Oceania is a melting pot of cultures, with indigenous traditions and customs still being practiced in many parts of the region. The diverse population of Oceania includes people of Polynesian, Melanesian, and Micronesian descent, as well as European, Asian, and African communities.

The traditional way of life in Oceania is closely tied to the land and sea, with fishing and agriculture being the main sources of livelihood for many communities. The region is also known for its vibrant music, dance, and art forms that reflect the rich cultural heritage of its people.

Environmental Concerns

Oceania is facing significant environmental challenges, including climate change, deforestation, and overfishing. Rising sea levels are threatening low-lying islands and coastal communities, while deforestation is causing loss of habitat for many endemic species. Overfishing is also a concern in the region, with many species of fish being overexploited.

To address these issues, countries in Oceania have implemented various conservation efforts and initiatives. For example, Australia has committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 26-28% by 2030 and has established marine protected areas to preserve its diverse marine life.

Conclusion

Oceania is a unique and diverse region that offers a wealth of natural beauty, cultural richness, and economic opportunities. With its stunning landscapes, vibrant cultures, and diverse wildlife, it is no wonder that Oceania continues to be a popular destination for travelers from all over the world. However, it is crucial to address the environmental challenges facing the region to ensure its sustainability for future generations.

Sources:

  • https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/what-are-the-five-regions-of-oceania.html
  • https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/oceania-population/
  • https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/what-is-the-largest-country-in-oceania.html
  • https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/regions/oceania/
  • https://www.worldwildlife.org/ecoregions/aa0113
  • https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/png/overview
  • https://www.wwf.org.au/news/blogs/the-state-of-the-pacific-ocean-and-its-future#gs.3z1l5o
  • What is the geography of Oceania?
    Oceania is a region made up of thousands of islands in the central and south Pacific Ocean. It includes countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea.
  • What is the population of Oceania?
    As of 2021, the estimated population of Oceania is around 41 million people.
  • What is the official language of Oceania?
    The official language varies by country, but English is widely spoken throughout the region.
  • What is the currency used in Oceania?
    The currency used in Oceania varies by country, with Australian and New Zealand dollars being the most commonly used.
  • What are some popular dishes in Oceania?
    Some popular dishes in Oceania include fish and chips, pavlova, and BBQ meats.
  • What is the traditional music of Oceania?
    The traditional music of Oceania includes a variety of styles such as Polynesian drumming, Maori chants, and Aboriginal didgeridoo playing.
  • What are some popular songs from Oceania?
    Some popular songs from Oceania include 'Down Under' by Men at Work, 'I See Red' by Split Enz, and 'Waltzing Matilda' by Banjo Paterson.
  • How can I find a tourist guide for Oceania?
    You can find a tourist guide for Oceania through various travel agencies or by searching online for certified tour guides in specific countries.
  • What are some popular tourist destinations in Oceania?
    Some popular tourist destinations in Oceania include the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, the beaches of Fiji, and the volcanic landscapes of New Zealand.
  • What is the best time to visit Oceania?
    The best time to visit Oceania depends on which country you are planning to visit. Generally, the dry season (April-October) is a good time to visit for pleasant weather.
  • Do I need a visa to travel to Oceania?
    It depends on your nationality and the country you are planning to visit. It is best to check with the embassy or consulate of the country you plan to visit for specific visa requirements.
  • What are some cultural customs in Oceania?
    Some cultural customs in Oceania include traditional dance performances, tattooing, and respect for elders.
  • What is the climate like in Oceania?
    The climate in Oceania varies by country, but it is generally warm and tropical with some areas experiencing cooler temperatures in the winter months.
  • What are some popular outdoor activities in Oceania?
    Some popular outdoor activities in Oceania include surfing, hiking, snorkeling, and whale watching.
  • What is the official religion of Oceania?
    The official religion varies by country, but Christianity is the most widely practiced religion in Oceania.
  • What are some traditional crafts in Oceania?
    Some traditional crafts in Oceania include weaving, wood carving, and tapa cloth making.
  • Can I use my cell phone in Oceania?
    Yes, most countries in Oceania have good cell phone coverage and you can use your phone with an international plan or purchase a local SIM card.
  • What is the time zone in Oceania?
    The time zone in Oceania varies by country, but most countries are in either UTC+10 or UTC+12.
  • What is the dress code in Oceania?
    The dress code in Oceania is generally casual, but it is important to dress modestly when visiting religious sites or attending traditional events.
  • Are there any dangerous animals in Oceania?
    There are some dangerous animals in Oceania, such as crocodiles and snakes, but they are mostly found in remote areas. It is important to follow safety precautions and avoid swimming in unknown waters.
  • What is the emergency number in Oceania?
    The emergency number in Oceania varies by country, but the most common number is 000.
  • Do I need to tip in Oceania?
    Tipping is not expected in most countries in Oceania, but it is appreciated for exceptional service.
  • What is the drinking age in Oceania?
    The legal drinking age varies by country, but it is generally 18 or 21 years old.
  • Can I drink tap water in Oceania?
    Tap water is generally safe to drink in most countries in Oceania, but it is best to check with locals or stick to bottled water if you are unsure.
  • What is the voltage used in Oceania?
    The voltage used in Oceania varies by country, but it is usually 230V with a frequency of 50Hz. Adapters may be necessary for some electronic devices.
  • What are some traditional festivals and celebrations in Oceania?
    Some traditional festivals and celebrations in Oceania include the Pasifika Festival in New Zealand, the Kava Festival in Fiji, and the National Multicultural Festival in Australia.
  • What is the legal system in Oceania?
    The legal system in Oceania varies by country, but most countries follow a similar common law system inherited from their former British colonizers.
  • What are some common modes of transportation in Oceania?
    Some common modes of transportation in Oceania include buses, taxis, ferries, and domestic flights.
  • What is the internet access like in Oceania?
    Internet access varies by country, but most major cities and tourist areas have good internet connectivity. Some remote areas may have limited or no internet access.
  • Can I use my credit card in Oceania?
    Credit cards are widely accepted in most countries in Oceania, but it is always best to carry some cash for smaller purchases or when visiting more rural areas.
  • What are some common languages spoken in Oceania?
    Some common languages spoken in Oceania include English, Maori, Fijian, and Tok Pisin.
  • Is there a lot of crime in Oceania?
    Crime rates vary by country, but overall, Oceania is considered a safe region for travelers. It is always important to take precautions and be aware of your surroundings.
  • What is the dress code for visiting religious sites in Oceania?
    When visiting religious sites in Oceania, it is important to dress modestly and cover your shoulders and knees out of respect for local customs.
  • What is the best way to exchange currency in Oceania?
    The best way to exchange currency in Oceania is through banks or authorized currency exchange offices. It is not recommended to exchange money with street vendors.
  • What is the tipping culture in Oceania?
    Tipping is not expected in most countries in Oceania, but it is appreciated for exceptional service.
  • Are there any travel restrictions for visiting Oceania?
    Travel restrictions may vary by country and can change at any time. It is important to check with the embassy or consulate of the country you plan to visit for the most up-to-date information.
  • What is the most common mode of transportation between islands in Oceania?
    The most common mode of transportation between islands in Oceania is by ferry or domestic flights.
  • What are some traditional sports in Oceania?
    Some traditional sports in Oceania include outrigger canoeing, surfing, and rugby.
  • Can I bring my pet to Oceania?
    Bringing pets to Oceania may be subject to strict quarantine regulations. It is best to check with the embassy or consulate of the country you plan to visit for specific requirements.
  • What are some traditional medicines used in Oceania?
    Some traditional medicines used in Oceania include herbal remedies and massage therapy.
  • What is the main mode of communication in Oceania?
    The main mode of communication in Oceania is through mobile phones and internet messaging apps such as WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger.
  • Is there a lot of poverty in Oceania?
    Poverty levels vary by country, but overall, most countries in Oceania have relatively low poverty rates compared to other regions.
  • What is the literacy rate in Oceania?
    The literacy rate in Oceania is generally high, with most countries having a literacy rate of over 90%.

A Closer Look at Oceania

Oceania Flag

Oceania

Oceania Neighbours

  1. Australia Australia
  2. Fiji Fiji
  3. French Polynesia French Polynesia
  4. Guam Guam
  5. Kiribati Kiribati
  6. Micronesia Micronesia
  7. Nauru Nauru
  8. New Caledonia New Caledonia
  9. New Zealand New Zealand
  10. Palau Palau
  11. Papua New Guinea Papua New Guinea
  12. Samoa Samoa
  13. The Marshall Islands The Marshall Islands
  14. The Solomon Islands The Solomon Islands
  15. Tonga Tonga
  16. Tuvalu Tuvalu
  17. Vanuatu Vanuatu

Exploring Oceania

Discover more details and learn about the upcoming festivities associated with Oceania Holidays

Origin of Oceania

Oceania is a region of the world that includes the islands of the Pacific Ocean. The region is divided into three major regions: Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia. Each of these regions contain a number of different countries, territories, and dependencies scattered across the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean. Oceania is often referred to as an 'island continent' due to its land mass being mainly composed of islands. The origin of Oceania is the subject of great debate, but many historians believe it to be the result of various migrations over thousands of years. These migrations are thought to have begun as early as 50,000 years ago, and were mainly from Southeast Asia and the islands of Taiwan and the Philippines. As people from these regions gradually spread out across the Pacific, they settled in various islands, developing distinct cultures and languages that remain today.

Culture

The cultures of Oceania are distinct from other regions of the world, with many cultures still practiced in their traditional forms. Music and dancing are prevalent in many of the island cultures, with unique instruments and rhythms existing within each. There is also a variety of culinary experiences to explore across the region, with many regional specialities a testament to the region's diverse tastes. Traditionally, many of the islanders also heavily relied upon the ocean for their livelihoods, with a variety of fishing and sailing techniques still being practiced to this day. Other specific practices are also distinct to particular islands, with unique cultures and sub-cultures existing across the region.

Sport

The people of Oceania have a long and storied history of playing sport, with many traditional and modern sports being popular across the region. The traditional games of batu, a game of pitoys (Volleyball) and kokopu (underwater diving) are all particularly popular, whilst more modern sports such as rugby union and football are also widely enjoyed. A number of professional teams from the region compete in a variety of sports, such as the Fiji Warriors who compete in rugby union and the Oceanic Football Confederation, who have teams from a number of countries competing in the FIFA World Cup. The Tonga national rugby union team also competes in international test matches, with the nation having produced a number of successful players over the years.

Religion

Religion is an integral part of the culture of Oceania, with Christianity being the religion practiced by the majority of the population. Catholicism, Protestantism, and Methodist forms of Christianity are all popular across the islands, though there is significant religious diversity across the region. Other than Christianity, other religions are also practiced albeit on a smaller scale; traditional religions such as animism, ancestor worship, and ancestor veneration are practiced on some islands, whilst other religions such as Islam, Hinduism, and Judaism are also practiced to varying extents.

Languages

Oceania is an extremely linguistically diverse region, with a vast array of languages that are distinct from those of other regions. English, Spanish, and French are the three main languages spoken across the region, with many other languages existing to varying extents, including a number of indigenous languages. In some of the smaller island countries, such as Kiribati and Tuvalu, a single language is widely spoken, with English often used as a lingua franca across the island. In Melanesia, the Papuan languages are the most prominent, with Tok Pisin being a widely used creole language.

Education

Education is an important priority for the countries of Oceania, and most countries have an established school system with access to primary and secondary education. Most universities are established in the larger cities and are often open to international students wishing to further their studies in the region. As well as universities, a number of other institutions such as community colleges, teachers' colleges, and technical colleges are spread across the region, allowing students to further their studies in specific fields.

Demographics

The population of Oceania is estimated at around 43 million people, spread across the approximately 8 million square kilometers of the region. The countries of Oceania are sparsely populated, with the largest nation, Papua New Guinea, having only an estimated 8.5 million people living on its land. Australia also has a significant population, with over 25 million people living in the country. The demographic make-up of the region is varied, with each region having its own unique diversity. In Melanesia for example, there are a number of ethnic groups with distinct physical features that reflect their original migratory lifestyles. In Polynesia, the Nicobarese are an ethnic group of mixed Southeast Asian and European origin, while the Pacific Islanders, Micronesians, and Polynesians are largely of mixed ethnicity.

Commerce

The countries of Oceania are active participants in the global economy, with many nations having established trading relationships with other countries across the globe. The countries of Oceania export a variety of commodities, ranging from agricultural goods such as coffee, cocoa, sugar, and fruit, to manufactured goods such as cars and electronics. The regions of Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia have all experienced significant economic growth in recent years, with many countries having established themselves as major players in the global economy due to their strong external trading links.

Weather

The weather in Oceania is largely determined by its close proximity to the equator, with temperatures rarely falling below 20°C (68°F) and the climate typically falling within the tropical range. In most of the regions, the weather is fairly consistent throughout the year, with warm temperatures and humid conditions usually occurring. Depending on the location, some areas may experience periods of intense rainfall during the wet season, or strong winds during the monsoon season. The islands of the Pacific are also subject to strong cyclones and typhoons during the tropical season, which can bring significant destruction to the areas affected.

Borders

The borders of Oceania are largely made up of water, with many countries being located far away from each other and having little in the way of physical barriers. This makes it easier for people to travel from one island country to another, though maritime laws must be taken into account when travelling in these waters. Some countries, such as New Zealand, have land borders with other nations, such as Australia. However for the majority of countries in the region, the borders are largely formed by the ocean. This includes the 200-mile-wide Exclusive Economic Zone of the countries bordering it, which delineates the boundaries of a country's marine resources and jurisdiction.

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Oceania Highest Point Name

The highest point in Oceania is Puncak Jaya in Papua New Guinea at 16,024 feet (4,884 meters). The peak of Puncak Jaya is snow-capped and is the highest point between the Himalayas and the Andes.

Oceania Official Languages

Oceania is a region with over 20 different countries, each of which has its own official language. Some of these languages include English (Australia, the Solomon Islands, Kiribati, Tuvalu, and New Zealand), French (New Caledonia, Wallis and Futuna, and French Polynesia), German (Papua New Guinea), and Tok Pisin (Papua New Guinea). Other official languages include Samoan, Tongan, Marshallese, Palauan, Fijian, Niuean, and Māori.

Oceania Ethnic Groups

Australia:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • British
  • Irish
  • Chinese
  • Italian
  • German
  • Greek
  • Indian
  • New Zealand Maori
  • Vietnamese
  • Filipino
  • Indonesian
  • African
  • Lebanese
  • Dutch
New Zealand:
  • European
  • Maori
  • Pacific Islanders
  • Chinese
  • Indian
  • South East Asian
Fiji:
  • Fijian
  • Indian
  • Rotuman
  • Chinese
  • European
  • Other Pacific Islanders
Papua New Guinea:
  • Melanesian
  • Papuan
  • Negrito
  • Micronesian
  • Polynesian
  • European
  • Chinese
  • Australian
Solomon Islands:
  • Melanesian
  • Polynesian
  • Micronesian
  • Some Papuan
  • Chinese
  • European
Vanuatu:
  • Melanesian
  • European
  • Chinese
  • Vietnamese
  • Filipino
  • Indonesian
  • Other Pacific Islanders
Marshall Islands:
  • Marshallese
  • Filipino
  • Chinese
  • Taiwanese
  • Korean
  • Japanese
  • Polynesians from other Pacific Islands
  • German
Micronesia:
  • Chuukese
  • Pohnpeian
  • Kosraean
  • Yapese
  • Yap Outer Islands (YOI)
  • Ulithi
  • Woleaian
  • Nukuoro
  • Kapingamarangi
Kiribati:
  • I-Kiribati
  • Tuvaluan
  • Banabans (from Ocean Island)
  • Gilbertese
  • People of European origin
Palau:
  • Palauan
  • Filipino
  • Chinese
  • Asian-Pacific Islanders
  • People of European origin

Oceania Religions

Australia is predominantly Christian. According to the 2016 census, 61.1% of people identified as Christian. Other religions practiced in Australia include Buddhism (2.5%), Islam (2.6%), Hinduism (1.9%), Sikhism (0.5%), and Judaism (0.4%). Indigenous Australians practice various forms of animism as well as Christianity. In New Zealand, Christianity is the most commonly practiced religion, with almost half the population (48%) identifying as Christian. Additionally, 32% of the population identify with no religion, 11.8% adhere to Hinduism, and 4.7% follow Buddhism. In Melanesia, most inhabitants are Christian, with Catholics being the dominant denomination. In Polynesia, Christianity is also the dominant religion, with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints being the largest in Samoa.

Oceania Total Area

The total land area of Oceania is 8,509,445.81 square miles. The country with the largest land area in Oceania is Australia, at 2,969,900 square miles.

Oceania Land Area

The land area of Oceania varies drastically. The largest country by land area is Australia, with 7,692,024 square kilometers. However, the land area of other countries in the region range from 0.2 square kilometers (Nauru) to 103,000 square kilometers (New Zealand).

Oceania Water Area

The total maritime area of Oceania is estimated to be approximately 20,622,820km^2. The countries in Oceania include Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, New Caledonia, Samoa, Guam, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

Oceania Total Population

The total population of Oceania is approximately 41.5 million people.

Oceania Currency Name

The most common currencies of Oceania are the Australian Dollar (AUD), the New Zealand Dollar (NZD), the Solomon Islands Dollar (SBD), and the Papua New Guinean Kina (PGK).

Oceania Currency Code

The currencies of each Oceania country vary depending on the country. Some common currencies used in Oceania are the Australian dollar (AUD), the New Zealand dollar (NZD), the Papua New Guinea kina (PGK), and the Solomon Islands dollar (SBD).

Oceania Currency Symbol

The currency symbol for the countries of Oceania varies depending on the country. The currency symbols for the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Tonga, Kiribati and the Cook Islands are all SBD (Solomon Islands Dollar), VUV (Vanuatus Vatu), FJD (Fijian Dollar), PGK (Papua New Guinean Kina), WST (Samoan Tala), TOP (Tongan Paʻanga), AUD (Australian Dollar), and NZD (New Zealand Dollar) respectively.

Oceania Time Zones

  • Standard Time: UTC+08:45
  • Daylight Saving Time: UTC+09:30
  • UTC+10:00

Australia divides the continent into three distinct time zones: Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST), and Australian Central Standard Time (ACST), and Australian Western Standard Time (AWST). UTC+10:00, UTC+09:30 and UTC+08:00, respectively. Daylight saving is observed in all three time zones, shifting forward the clocks by one hour from the last Sunday of October through the first Sunday of April. This adjustment is an attempt to allow more daylight hours in the evening, thus reducing the reliance on artificial lighting.

How to Say "Oceania" In Different Languages?

English
Oceania (en-AU)
Cook Islands Maori
Ākarana (rar-CK)
Fijian
Oseania (fj-FJ)
French
Océanie (fr-FR)
German
Ozeanien (de-DE)
Indonesian
Oseania (id-ID)
Japanese
オセアニア (ja-JP)
Gilbertese
Otanai (gil-KI)
Marshallese
Okianɨaan (mh-MH)
Maori
Okeania (mi-NZ)
Spanish
Oceanía (es-NI)
Norwegian
Oseania (no-NO)
Tok Pisin
Oseania (tpi-PG)
Tagalog
Oseaniya (tl-PH)
Samoan
Okesia (sm-WS)
Solomon Islands Pijin
Oseania (spn-SB)
Tongan
Houʻeiki (to-TO)
Tuvaluan
Fuakava (tvl-TV)
Bislama
Oseania (bi-VU)
Futuna-Aniwa
Oseani (fud-WF)

Oceania Popular Holidays

Yom Kippur
22-23 September
Rosh Hashanah
1-2 October
Palestine Day of Solidarity
30 Janaury
Eid al-Fitr
23-24 May
Australia Day
26 January
Waitangi Day
6 February
Hobart Regatta Day
7 February
Valentine's Day
14 February
Adelaide Fringe Festival
17 February (18 March)
Mawson's Hike
20 February
Southern Cross Festival
10 March
Youth Day
12 March
Holi Festival
13 March
Hobart Cup Day
13 March
Adelaide's Festival of Arts
14 March
St Patrick’s Day
17 March
Harmony Day
23 March
Good Friday
2 April
Easter Sunday
4 April
Easter Monday
5 April
Vaisakhi
13 April
Australia's Got Talent Finals
16 April
Somoa Flag Day
17 April
London Marathon
22 April
Harvest Day
23 April
Anzac Day
25 April
Fronteir Day
30 April
Labor Day
1 May
Coconut Day
4 May
Mother’s Day
9 May
Queen's Birthday Picnic
13 May
National Sorry Day
26 May
National Day of Reconciliation
27 May
National Black Dog Day
31 May
Samoa Independence Day
1 June
King’s Birthday
1 June
Tonga Independence Day
4 June
TSO Gala Performance
4 June
Western Australia Day
6 June
Sydney Film Festival
7 June
Queen’s Birthday
8 June
Turnsole Day
9 June
Winter Solstice
22 June
Gold Coast Marathon
3 July
Supercars Townsville 400
7 July
Solomon Islands Independence Day
7 July
Kiribati Constitution Day
12 July
Endeavour Day
13 July
Bastille Day/French National Day
14 July
Father’s Day
6 August
Melbourne International Film Festival
8 August
Hawaii Statehood Day
18 August
Papua New Guinea Independence Day
16 September
New Caledonia Flag Day
24 September
Kings Cup
28 September
Fiji Day
10 October
Father's Day Rugby League Test match
11 October
Australian Whisky Awards
20 October
Uluru Day
26 October
Halloween
31 October
Guy Fawkes Day
5 November
Melbourne Cup
7 November
Remembrance Day
11 November
Diwali
14 November
Victory Day
9 December
Australia’s Human Rights Day
10 December
Australia and New Zealand Test Match
11 December
His Majesty’s Birthday
17 December
Civil Union Day
19 December
Christmas Day
25 December
Sydney to Hobart
26 December
Boxing Day
26 December

VERIFY COUNTRY DATA:
We aim for precision and fairness. If you notice an inconsistency, contact us here.

Upcoming Holidays in Oceania

National and Public Holidays in Oceania next days/week/month/year

Australia Day

Australia Day is an annual national holiday which celebrates the history and culture of Australia. The day marks the anniversary of the first fleet of British ships arriving in Australia in 1788. Australians celebrate with barbecues, fireworks displays, and other festivities. Volunteers often participate in clean-up events around the country, and citizens gather to listen to flag-raising ceremonies and to sing the national anthem.

Upcoming Festivals in Oceania

National and Public Holidays around the world in the next few days

Special Working Day in Taiwan

Welcome to 'Special Working Day, Taiwan.' For nearly a decade, we, the people of Taiwan, have commemorated this day by gathering together and recognizing those who strive to make our nation a better place. Special Working Day is a working day on weekend in Taiwan.

Leap Day in United States of America

Celebrate the extra day of the year in style with Leap Day in the United States of America! This unique observance allows for an additional 24 hours of exploration, making it the perfect time to discover hidden gems and indulge in local traditions. Don't miss out on this special national holiday.

Texas Independence Day in USA

Texas Independence Day commemorates the signing of the Texas Declaration of Independence in 1836. This holiday celebrates the state's secession from Mexico, affirming its sovereignty and the foundation of the Republic of Texas.

Texas Independence Day in United States of America

Texas Independence Day is a legal holiday in Texas, in the United States.

Remembrance and Gratitude Day in Moldova

"Experience the rich culture and traditions of Moldova on the heartwarming Remembrance and Gratitude Day. This national holiday celebrates the sacrifices and contributions of soldiers and civilians, with solemn observances and festive gatherings across the country. Immerse yourself in the patriotic spirit and pay tribute to the brave heroes of Moldova on this meaningful occasion."

Adwa Victory Day in Ethiopia

"Join in on the vibrant celebrations of Adwa Victory Day, a national holiday in Ethiopia, commemorating the historic triumph over Italian colonialism. Immerse yourself in traditional ceremonies, lively music, and delicious cuisine while soaking up the rich cultural heritage of this proud nation. A must-see experience for any travel enthusiast!"

Remembrance Day observed in Marshall Islands

"Join the people of the Marshall Islands in honoring those who have served and sacrificed for their country on National Remembrance Day. Immerse yourself in the rich cultural traditions and impressive ceremonies that pay tribute to the brave soldiers who have defended the nation. A must-visit for history enthusiasts and a defining experience for all. #MarshallIslands #RemembranceDay #NationalHoliday"

National Flag Day in Bangladesh

"National Flag Day in Bangladesh is a proud and patriotic observance held annually on December 17th. The vibrant display of the national flag, known as 'Bengal's Red and Green', symbolizes the country's rich history and cultural diversity. Celebrations include parades, cultural performances, and flag hoisting ceremonies, making it a must-see spectacle for travelers and a meaningful experience for locals."

Peasants’ Day in Myanmar

"Experience the vibrant and authentic traditions of Myanmar on Peasants' Day, a national holiday honoring the hardworking farmers and laborers of the country. Immerse yourself in the lively festivities and witness the colorful parades, traditional dances, and delicious local cuisine that make this a truly unique cultural celebration."

Veteran’s Day in East Timor

On this special day, the people of East Timor come together to honor and remember the sacrifices made by our brave veterans. This national holiday allows us to reflect on the country's history and pay tribute to those who have served and continue to serve our nation.

Tropical cyclone upgraded to ‘severe’ as it nears Australia

Tropical cyclone upgraded to ‘severe’ as it nears Australia

SYDNEY: A tropical cyclone off the coast of northern Australia was upgraded to the “severe” Category 3 today, hours before it was set to make landfall along the coastline bordering the Great Barrier Reef, the second such cyclone in the area since December. The bureau of meteorology said Tropical Cyclone Kirrily will cross the coast near the tourist town of Townsville tonight, bringing with it wind gusts of up to 165kph. Intense rain accompanying the cyclone may cause life threatening flash flooding in the storm’s path and those within 100km of coastline north and south of Townsville should shelter in a safe place, the Bureau said. Queensland premier Steven Miles said today before the storm was upgraded that residents should…

Source: Free Malaysia Today
Categories: Science, Earth Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Health, Public Health and Safety, Tropical Health

Southwest Investors Slam Exit Bid In Holiday Outage Suit – Law360 UK

Southwest Investors Slam Exit Bid In Holiday Outage Suit – Law360 UK

By Sydney Price (January 30, 2024, 8:21 PM EST) — Southwest Airlines investors have pushed back on the company’s bid to escape a consolidated class action alleging the airliner downplayed risks associated with its outdated scheduling technology that resulted in a disastrous 2022 holiday travel season, saying Southwest’s reliance on another ongoing securities suit against the company as precedent is misplaced….

Source: law360.com
Categories: Recreation, Travel, Transportation, Business, Financial Services, Leasing Services, Transportation and Logistics, Fleet Maintenance

GLOBAL MARKETS-Asian shares track Wall Street higher; China deflation risks persist

GLOBAL MARKETS-Asian shares track Wall Street higher; China deflation risks persist

SYDNEY, Feb 8 (Reuters) – Most Asian markets tracked Wall Street higher on Thursday, but Chinese stocks were battling to sustain a rally after data raised concerns about deflationary pressures in China and suggested the economic slowdown may have further to run. Japan’s Nikkei surged 1.5%, while MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.2%, with gains in Australia and South Korea being eroded by a 0.2% fall in Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index. Shares of Alibaba fell 5.2% as its third-quarter revenues missed estimates. China’s blue-chips were up 0.4% in volatile trade, after climbing for three straight sessions to move away from five-year lows as Beijing rolled out a slew of measures to steady the market rout.…

Source: Yahoo! Finance
Categories: Business, Investing, Stocks and Bonds, Day Trading, Home, Personal Finance, Guides

Asian shares track Wall Street higher; China deflation risks persist By Reuters

Asian shares track Wall Street higher; China deflation risks persist By Reuters

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Most Asian markets tracked Wall Street higher on Thursday, but Chinese stocks were battling to sustain a rally after data raised concerns about deflationary pressures in China and suggested the economic slowdown may have further to run. Japan’s Nikkei surged 1.5%, while MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.2%, with gains in Australia and South Korea being eroded by a 0.2% fall in Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index. Shares of Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) fell 5.2% as its third-quarter revenues missed estimates. China’s blue-chips were up 0.4% in volatile trade, after climbing for three straight sessions to move away from five-year lows as Beijing rolled out a slew of measures to steady the market rout. Shanghai…

Source: Investing.com
Categories: Business, Investing, Stocks and Bonds, Day Trading, Home, Personal Finance, Guides

Asian shares track Wall Street higher; China deflation risks persist

Asian shares track Wall Street higher; China deflation risks persist

SYDNEY, Feb 8 (Reuters) – Most Asian markets tracked Wall Street higher on Thursday, but Chinese stocks were battling to sustain a rally after data raised concerns about deflationary pressures in China and suggested the economic slowdown may have further to run. Japan’s Nikkei surged 1.5%, while MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.2%, with gains in Australia and South Korea being eroded by a 0.2% fall in Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index. Shares of Alibaba fell 5.2% as its third-quarter revenues missed estimates. China’s blue-chips were up 0.4% in volatile trade, after climbing for three straight sessions to move away from five-year lows as Beijing rolled out a slew of measures to steady the market rout.…

Source: Market Screener
Categories: Business, Investing, Stocks and Bonds, Day Trading, Home, Personal Finance, Guides

Soybeans, corn hover near 3-year lows as speculators bet on lower prices

Soybeans, corn hover near 3-year lows as speculators bet on lower prices

CANBERRA, Feb 12 (Reuters) – Chicago soybeans and corn futures edged higher on Monday, but remained near three-year lows as the U.S. government raised its estimates for inventories and speculators bet on further price drop amid plentiful global supply. Wheat edged lower as cheap shipments from the Black Sea region continued to pressure prices. * The most-active soybean contract on the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) was up 0.3% at $11.87-1/2 a bushel by 0157 GMT and CBOT corn edged 0.2% higher to $4.29-3/4 a bushel, while wheat dipped 0.1% to $5.96 a bushel. * Beans and corn fell last week to their lowest levels since December 2020, with soybeans at $11.79 and corn at $4.28-1/4. Wheat is holding some…

Source: Market Screener
Categories: Society, Issues, Economic, Business, Investing, Day Trading, Commodities and Futures, Agriculture and Forestry, Marketplaces

GRAINS-Soybeans, corn hover near 3-year lows as speculators bet on…

CANBERRA, Feb 12 (Reuters) – Chicago soybeans and corn futures edged higher on Monday, but remained near three-year lows as the U.S. government raised its estimates for inventories and speculators bet on further price drop amid plentiful global supply. Wheat edged lower as cheap shipments from the Black Sea region continued to pressure prices. FUNDAMENTALS * The most-active soybean contract on the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) was up 0.3% at $11.87-1/2 a bushel by 0157 GMT and CBOT corn edged 0.2% higher to $4.29-3/4 a bushel, while wheat dipped 0.1% to $5.96 a bushel. * Beans and corn fell last week to their lowest levels since December 2020, with soybeans at $11.79 and corn at $4.28-1/4. Wheat is holding…

Source: Daily Mail Online
Categories: Society, Issues, Economic, Business, Investing, Day Trading, Commodities and Futures, Agriculture and Forestry, Marketplaces

Soybeans, corn hover near 3-year lows as speculators bet on lower prices

Soybeans, corn hover near 3-year lows as speculators bet on lower prices

CANBERRA, Feb 12 (Reuters) – Chicago soybeans and corn futures rose on Monday but remained near three-year lows as demand in top importer China fell and speculators bet on further price declines. Wheat fell as cheap shipments from the Black Sea region continued to pressure prices. The most-active soybean contract on the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) was up 0.4% at $11.88-1/4 a bushel by 0525 GMT, while CBOT corn rose 0.2% to $4.30 a bushel. Both contracts fell last week to their lowest levels since December 2020, with soybeans touching $11.79 and corn $4.28-1/4. CBOT Wheat dipped 0.3% to $5.94-3/4 a bushel, holding some distance above a three-year low of $5.40 reached last September. Supply of soybeans from South…

Source: Market Screener
Categories: Business, Investing, Day Trading, Games, Puzzles, Mazes, Agriculture and Forestry, Marketplaces, Science, Agriculture, Crop Plants

Kiwi slips as rate-hike talk ebbs, Aussie struggles on mixed data

Kiwi slips as rate-hike talk ebbs, Aussie struggles on mixed data

SYDNEY, Feb 13 (Reuters) – The New Zealand dollar slipped on Tuesday after an easing in inflation expectations trimmed some of the bets around a possible rate hike, while the Australian dollar struggled amid mixed local data. The kiwi dollar fell 0.5% to $0.6098, having also eased 0.3% overnight as the talks of another rate hike faded a little. It now has support at $0.6080, while resistance is at around $0.6150. Data showed on Tuesday that New Zealand’s inflation expectations fell to more than two-year lows in the first quarter, suggesting that the aggressive streak of past rate hikes were able to contain high prices. Two-year swap rates duly retreated to 5.175%, off from its 2-1/2 month high of 5.245%…

Source: Market Screener
Categories: Business, Investing, Day Trading

Chinese shares sustain rally, Nikkei vaults to new heights

Chinese shares sustain rally, Nikkei vaults to new heights

SYDNEY, Feb 8 (Reuters) – Chinese shares managed to hold onto weekly gains on Thursday as Beijing rolled out a slew of measures to revive market sentiment ahead of a week-long holiday, while the Nikkei vaulted to new heights after the Bank of Japan ruled out rapid rate hikes. European markets are likely to open higher, with EUROSTOXX 50 futures up 0.1%. U.S. futures were mostly flat. In Asia, Japan’s Nikkei surged 2.1% to close at its highest level in 34 years, helped by a 10% jump in SoftBank Group after key holding Arm forecast sales and profit exceeding the market’s expectations. The Japanese yen slipped 0.3% to 148.63 per dollar and 10-year yields came off early highs to 0.695%…

Source: Market Screener
Categories: Business, Investing, Stocks and Bonds, Home, Personal Finance, Guides

Thousands protest Australia Day celebrations

Thousands protest Australia Day celebrations

MELBOURNE: Tens of thousands of Australians took to the streets on Friday, protesting a contentious national holiday that also marks the arrival of European colonists more than 200 years ago. In Sydney, Melbourne and several other cities, thousands of “Invasion Day” protesters demanded the date of the annual Australia Day celebrations be changed. The public holiday is held on January 26 every year. For most Australians, it is synonymous with a day off work, a barbecue, Test match cricket, a trip to the beach and the end of the summer holidays. But the choice of date – which marks the arrival of European settlers at Sydney Harbour in 1788 – has become increasingly contentious. Indigenous activists say Europeans’ arrival heralded…

Source: Free Malaysia Today
Categories: Business, Agriculture and Forestry, Trade Shows, Sports, Croquet, Image Galleries

Residents of northern Australia batten down homes, businesses ahead of Tropical Cyclone Kirrily

Residents of northern Australia batten down homes, businesses ahead of Tropical Cyclone Kirrily

BRISBANE, Australia (AP) — Residents have begun battening down homes and businesses with Tropical Cyclone Kirrily forecast to cross the Australian northeast coast on Thursday, bringing destructive winds and flooding rain. Authorities said the storm system was still tracking west across the Coral Sea and that gusts of 140 kph (87 mph) are forecast as the cyclone crossed the mainland on Thursday night. “It’s still making a pretty direct track for Townsville, but it is picking up speed along with its strength as well,” Miriam Bradbury from the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on Wednesday. The Bureau said the cyclone would bring intense rainfall that could cause “dangerous and life threatening flash flooding,” and storm…

Source: Yahoo
Categories: Science, Earth Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Technology

Residents of northern Australia batten down homes, businesses ahead…

Residents of northern Australia batten down homes, businesses ahead…

BRISBANE, Australia (AP) – Residents have begun battening down homes and businesses with Tropical Cyclone Kirrily forecast to cross the Australian northeast coast on Thursday, bringing destructive winds and flooding rain. Authorities said the storm system was still tracking west across the Coral Sea and that gusts of 140 kph (87 mph) are forecast as the cyclone crossed the mainland on Thursday night. “It´s still making a pretty direct track for Townsville, but it is picking up speed along with its strength as well,” Miriam Bradbury from the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on Wednesday. The Bureau said the cyclone would bring intense rainfall that could cause “dangerous and life threatening flash flooding,” and storm…

Source: Daily Mail Online
Categories: Science, Earth Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Technology

World News | Residents of Northern Australia Batten Down Homes, Businesses Ahead of Tropical Cyclone Kirrily | LatestLY

World News | Residents of Northern Australia Batten Down Homes, Businesses Ahead of Tropical Cyclone Kirrily | LatestLY

Brisbane, Jan 25 (AP) Residents have begun battening down homes and businesses with Tropical Cyclone Kirrily forecast to cross the Australian northeast coast on Thursday, bringing destructive winds and flooding rain. Authorities said the storm system was still tracking west across the Coral Sea and that gusts of 140 kph (87 mph) are forecast as the cyclone crossed the mainland on Thursday night. Also Read | Mary Kom Announces Retirement Citing Age Limitations: Live Breaking News Headlines & Updates, January 25, 2024. “It’s still making a pretty direct track for Townsville, but it is picking up speed along with its strength as well,” Miriam Bradbury from the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) said to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on Wednesday. The…

Source: LatestLY
Categories: Science, Earth Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Technology

2 monuments symbolizing Australia’s colonial past damaged by protesters ahead of polarizing holiday

2 monuments symbolizing Australia’s colonial past damaged by protesters ahead of polarizing holiday

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Two monuments symbolizing Australia’s colonial past were damaged by protesters on Thursday ahead of an increasingly polarizing national holiday that marks the anniversary of British settlement. A statue in Melbourne of British naval officer James Cook, who in 1770 charted Sydney’s coast, was sawn off at the ankles, while a Queen Victoria monument in the city’s Queen Victoria Gardens was doused in red paint. × Already a Subscriber? Sign in You are logged in Switch accounts Images posted on social media showed the body of the Cook statue lying on the ground with the words “The colony will fall” spray-painted on the stone plinth where the statue formerly stood. ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW Protesters…

Source: The Star
Categories: Business, Agriculture and Forestry, Trade Shows, Politics

Tropical cyclone upgraded to ‘severe’ as it approaches Australian coast

Tropical cyclone upgraded to ‘severe’ as it approaches Australian coast

SYDNEY – A tropical cyclone off the coast of northern Australia was upgraded to the “severe” category three on Jan 25, hours before it was set to make landfall along the coastline bordering the Great Barrier Reef, the second such cyclone in the area since December. The Bureau of Meteorology said tropical cyclone Kirrily will cross the coast near the tourist town of Townsville on the night of Jan 25, bringing with it wind gusts of up to 165km per hour. Intense rain accompanying the cyclone may cause life-threatening flash flooding in the storm’s path and those within 100km of coastline north and south of Townsville should shelter in a safe place, the bureau said. Queensland Premier Steven Miles said…

Source: The Straits Times
Categories: Science, Earth Sciences, Atmospheric Sciences, Health, Public Health and Safety, Tropical Health, Technology

Australians protest British colonization on a national holiday some mark as ‘Invasion Day’

Australians protest British colonization on a national holiday some mark as ‘Invasion Day’

SYDNEY (AP) — Thousands of Australians protested the anniversary of British colonization of their country with large crowds Friday urging for Australia Day to be moved and for a day of mourning on the holiday some call “Invasion Day.” The holiday marks the arrival of 11 British ships carrying convicts at Port Jackson in present-day Sydney on Jan. 26, 1788. For many activists, the day marked the beginning of a sustained period of discrimination and expulsion of Indigenous people from their land without a treaty. × Already a Subscriber? Sign in You are logged in Switch accounts Thousands of people, many of whom waved Indigenous flags, rallied in front of the Victoria state parliament in Melbourne, calling for an official…

Source: The Star
Categories: Business, Agriculture and Forestry, Trade Shows, Health, Public Health and Safety, Indigenous Health

Australians protest British colonization on a national holiday some mark as ‘Invasion Day’

Australians protest British colonization on a national holiday some mark as ‘Invasion Day’

SYDNEY (AP) — Thousands of Australians protested the anniversary of British colonization of their country with large crowds Friday urging for Australia Day to be moved and for a day of mourning on the holiday some call “Invasion Day.” The holiday marks the arrival of 11 British ships carrying convicts at Port Jackson in present-day Sydney on Jan. 26, 1788. For many activists, the day marked the beginning of a sustained period of discrimination and expulsion of Indigenous people from their land without a treaty. Thousands of people, many of whom waved Indigenous flags, rallied in front of the Victoria state parliament in Melbourne, calling for an official day of mourning to be declared across Australia. Large crowds in Sydney…

Source: Spectrum News Bay News 9
Categories: Business, Agriculture and Forestry, Trade Shows, Health, Public Health and Safety, Indigenous Health, Arts and Entertainment

World News | Australians Protest British Colonisation on a National Holiday Some Mark as ”Invasion Day” | LatestLY

World News | Australians Protest British Colonisation on a National Holiday Some Mark as ”Invasion Day” | LatestLY

Sydney, Jan 26 (AP) Thousands of Australians protested the anniversary of British colonisation of their country with large crowds on Friday urging for Australia Day to be moved and for a day of mourning on the holiday some call “Invasion Day”. The holiday marks the arrival of 11 British ships carrying convicts at Port Jackson in present-day Sydney on January 26, 1788. For many activists, the day marked the beginning of a sustained period of discrimination and expulsion of Indigenous people from their land without a treaty. Also Read | Georgia Twins Separated at Birth Reunited 19 Years Later Thanks to TikTok Video. Thousands of people, many of whom waved Indigenous flags, rallied in front of the Victoria state parliament…

Source: LatestLY
Categories: Business, Agriculture and Forestry, Trade Shows

Australia Day Marked by Indigenous Protests of British ‘Invasion’

Australia Day Marked by Indigenous Protests of British ‘Invasion’

SYDNEY — Thousands of Australians protested the anniversary of British colonization of their country with large crowds Friday urging for Australia Day to be moved and for a day of mourning on the holiday some call “Invasion Day.” The holiday marks the arrival of 11 British ships carrying convicts at Port Jackson in present-day Sydney on Jan. 26, 1788. For many activists, the day marked the beginning of a sustained period of discrimination and expulsion of Indigenous people from their land without a treaty. Thousands of people, many of whom waved Indigenous flags, rallied in front of the Victoria state parliament in Melbourne, calling for an official day of mourning to be declared across Australia. Large crowds in Sydney chanted…

Source: TIME
Categories: Business, Agriculture and Forestry, Trade Shows, Health, Public Health and Safety, Indigenous Health, Arts and Entertainment